30 Years Ago: Students of the fifth and sixth grade L.E.A.P. program built this scarecrow for Emma Krumbee’s contest

Students of the fifth and sixth grade L.E.A.P. program built this scarecrow for Emma Krumbee’s contest to promote awareness of the dangers of styrofoam in the environment. These students have been working on many tasks to express their beliefs about this issue. They are (front row from left) Shane O’Reilly, Harold Baumann, Holly Palmer, Nicole Gerdes, and Susan Denzer. (Back row from left) Emily Hodapp, Isaac Giesen, Tonya Chevalier, and Michael Berg. Their teacher is Pauline Callahan.

From Our Files - 10 Years Ago

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Thirty Years Ago (1989)

Students of the fifth and sixth grade L.E.A.P. program built this scarecrow for Emma Krumbee’s contest to promote awareness of the dangers of styrofoam in the environment. These students have been working on many tasks to express their beliefs about this issue. They are (front row from left) Shane O’Reilly, Harold Baumann, Holly Palmer, Nicole Gerdes, and Susan Denzer. (Back row from left) Emily Hodapp, Isaac Giesen, Tonya Chevalier, and Michael Berg. Their teacher is Pauline Callahan.

An informational meeting for those in Belle Plaine interested in joining a Lions Club was scheduled for Tuesday, Nov. 14, at 7:30 p.m., at the Civic Center. As a volunteer service organization, a Lions Club raises funds and gives their time to help the less fortunate in their community. The Lions’ district governor maintained that the more organizations in a town, the better the town.

A life-sized replica of a Charolais bull was stolen from the Wayne Ediger property on Stoppelmann Boulevard on Oct. 30. It was painted on ¾ inch plywood and mounted to six by six posts. Ediger received the bull as a Father’s Day present and had just recently put it up on his property. He was offering a $200 reward for information leading to the arrest of the vandals.

A new project at BPHS was similar to the old-fashioned one-room schoolhouse, according to Scott Hallgren, instructor of the new Learning and Career Development Lab, since, for example, eight students were doing eight different things at the same time. In conjunction with the Carver-Scott Co-op Center, the purpose of the learning lab was to provide an alternative approach to achieve academic and career success for all students and adults in the community. The most popular aspect of the lab was for students to make up classes they had failed or in which they had received an incomplete. Belle Plaine was the first district in the area to have this satellite program.

Students of the fifth and sixth grade L.E.A. P. program built a scarecrow, called “Wrecks Styrofoamus”, for Emma Krumbee’s contest to promote awareness of the dangers of Styrofoam, which contains chlorofluorocarbons, in the environment. According to the students’ research, CFC molecules eventually float up to the ozone layer, where one CFC molecule can destroy 100,000 ozone molecules and cause a hole to form in the ozone. Also as part of their efforts to save the environment, the L.E.A.P. students wrote letters to companies who used Styrofoam in their packaging and organized a boycott of McDonald’s by convincing their classmates that they should eat at Burger King on their way home from their ELC field trip.

Sharon Blume shot her first deer Saturday, Nov. 4, near High Island Creek in Jessenland Township, downing a small buck with her 12-gauge. Besides Blume, the successful hunters in her party of ten were Jerry Hennen, Gordon Kruschke, LeRoy Moenke, and Pat Schuneman.

Marty Siemon was a patient in the Brainerd hospital as a result of a deer hunting accident on Saturday, Nov. 4. Siemon was climbing into a deer stand when a tree limb broke and he fell about ten feet breaking two ribs and crushing a few vertebrae. Siemon was on an annual hunting trip with Ron Fenske and Art Melchoir.

The BPHS volleyball team ended their season with the second place district trophy and medals, after losing to the New Prague Trojans in the district championship game. The Tigers had taken control by playing smart volleyball and capitalizing on the Trojans’ errors, leading 5-0 in the first game, 13-0 in the second, and 6-3 in the third. However, the Tigers saw their leads dwindle away by a very determined New Prague team. When the momentum switched in New Prague’s favor, the Tigers were unable to stop Terri Gill’s deadly topspin serve, which accounted for 21 service points. Seniors playing their final game were Denise Koepp, Lisa Otto, Jenny Klehr, Kim Voss, Melanie Wolf, Melissa Wolf, and Kristin Witt.

The Minnesota River Conference named Mike Mahoney to the All-Conference Football Team for the 1989 season. Receiving honorable mention were Kirby McDonald and Mark Mahoney.  

60 Years Ago (1959)

The Borough Council awarded a $20,015.80 contract to Juul Construction of Bloomington for installation of storm sewer, sanitary sewer and water main improvements. Juul’s bid was lowest of the five submitted. The borough furnished the pipe that was purchased for $6,095.16.

Services were held at the St. Thomas church for Mrs. Nora Shaughnessy, a well-loved and lifelong member of that parish. She died at the New Prague hospital at the age of 62. She was born and lived in the St. Thomas area all her life.

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Buszmann were surprised with a housewarming party at their new home in Belle Plaine.

Those in charge of the Sister Kenny Drive in the west portion of Scott County were Mrs. Albert Trost of Belle Plaine, Art Dahlke of St. Lawrence Township, Mrs. Cletus Riesgraf of Belle Plaine Township, and Mrs. Frank Meyers of Blakeley Township.

“We must hold the line on spending,” was the message Congressman Ancher Nelsen told Scott County Republicans at their convention that convened in Belle Plaine at the Borough Hall.

The Scott County Jail in the new public safety building at Shakopee opened with a packed house when placed in use for the first time. Ten men were booked at the jail its first night of operation although the jail contained only eight cells.

Arnold K. Sandager tendered his resignation as Scott County’s agricultural agent, having accepted a new post at Stillwater as Washington County’s agent.

William C. Holz, a resident of Belle Plaine for 12 years, died at his home in Belle Plaine of a heart ailment. He was 75 years old. Mr. Holz moved here from St. Paul following his marriage to Mrs. Clara L. Bigaouette.

Mr. and Mrs. William Smith observed their 60th wedding anniversary with a number of relatives and friends calling at their Blakeley residence.

Belle Plaine firemen were kept jumping with the alarm sounding three days in a row. None of the blazes, a corn picker and tractor fire, a brush fire, and a semi-truck tire fire, was serious.

Carl Gottfried Schmidt, lifelong resident of Benton Township, died suddenly of a heart attack at the age of 73. In his younger days, he worked for several years at the Neubeiser Hardware Store in Belle Plaine.

The Moisan family gathered together to help Oscar Moisan celebrate his 87th birthday. He was recovering from a cataract operation.

A cougar, mountain lion, puma or something like that was thought to be loose in nearby Le Sueur County. At least that was the firm conviction of Le Sueur County Sheriff Pat Smith who had a whole file of reports on the animal, including a sighting, a deer carcass, and his own investigation of large, cat-like round tracks.

Miss Emma Stier and Arthur Krueger were quietly married the previous week.

The 1959 BPHS football season came to a close on the rain-soaked Montgomery gridiron. The Tigers lost 18-0, playing on the worst field conditions ever witnessed. The Tigers ended the year with a conference record of 1-5.

Instant coffee was 79 cents, a 25-lb. bag of sugar was $2.69, six cans of soup were $1, and two packages of Wheaties or Cheerios cereal sold for 49 cents at Huber’s Red Owl.

90 Years Ago (1929)

A state school inspector was stopping at all the town schools to give orders that the schools would have to open at 8:45 instead of the traditional 9 o’clock.

James H. Wilson and Alfred Albrecht established a new undertaking and furniture business in the Keup building.

The marriage of Richard Kahle, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kahle, and Verona Bigot of Shakopee took place. Mae Brown of Shakopee and Walter Trost of Jordan were the attendants.

A score of farmers from this area went to Vernon Center to attend the state corn-husking contest. Over a thousand farmers from all parts of the state were there. Corn-husking contests were the prime fall events.

Many Blakeley and Jessenland people were at Shakopee to attend the military funeral of Fred Nelson, son of the late Charles and Mary Nelson.

The St. Thomas neighborhood gathered for a farewell party for Mr. and Mrs. John Clifford who were retiring to Le Sueur.

The marriage of Miss Hazel Mary Doheny of Jessenland and William F. Flannery of Assumption took place at the Jessenland Church, with Father Sullivan officiating. Relatives and friends in very large numbers were present from the Twin Cities and nearby parishes.

G.A. Youngquist, the Gotha boy who spent part of his boyhood as a helper at Ed Larson’s creamery, was appointed that week to a high federal position. He was to have complete charge of all matters concerning national prohibition. The previous year he was elected to the office of Minnesota’s attorney general, from which he resigned to take the federal appointment.

Arnold E. Panning, son of the Herman Pannings of Hamburg, had traveled far from his native Carver County village. He was interested in art, graduated from an art school, studied in Europe, and was then appointed art manager for a big New York concern.

At the Church of the Incarnation, Minneapolis took place the marriage of Alice Shaughnessy, daughter of Mrs. Annie Shaughnessy, formerly of Jessenland, to Hugo O. Lamm of Minneapolis.

120 Years Ago (1899)

It was a wonderful fall season weather-wise; farmers were far advanced with their work.

Husking bees was the order of the day. At the F. Anderson farm north of town, there was a gathering 36 huskers.

Dennis Galvin, brakeman on the Omaha, expressed the opinion that the railroad unloaded more freight at Belle Plaine than at any other station between St. Paul and Mankato.

Mayor Hahn named a committee to see the attorney general to learn if the borough had the legal right to expend tax funds in repair of the river road in Sibley County.

P.H. Anderson, the Gotha blacksmith, erected a new blacksmith shop and a new dwelling for his family.

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