Learning from the Past Ad

An ad that appeared weekly in the Herald during the last few months of 1918. According to the National Museum of American History, Hill’s Bromide Cascara Quinine was recommended for the relief of the following discomforts usually associated with colds: nasal stuffiness and discharge, headache, muscular aches and pains, neuralgia and neuritic pains, constipation, and that hot, flushed feeling. This product contained the following active ingredients: acetophenetidin (2 grs. per tablet), cascara sagrada, quinine sulfate, aloin, aspirin, and ephedrine sulfate.

As we continue our look at the Herald’s coverage of the Spanish Flu epidemic almost a hundred years ago, we turn to the Nov. 21st issue in 1918.  Following is exactly what appeared on the front page.

SCHOOLS CLOSED

Stricter Flu

Regulations in Effect -

Cases Develop

Following the second order to close the schools, the local board of health announces stricter rules for restricting the spread of influenza. Health Officer Bohland states that there is not only a ban on all public gatherings, but there must be no private parties during this period.

“Don’t mingle with other people any more than you can help; don’t invite people to your house,” he said.

Notices were served saloonkeepers prohibiting congregating in saloons, ordering removal of chairs and standing within three feet of another person.

The public school which was closed the past week resumed sessions Monday. On Tuesday forenoon, the Health Officer ordered the school closed again. The parochial school did not reopen this week. The school closing order is for this week only but will probably be extended.

The present status of the epidemic in Belle Plaine is not clear. Two children in the Alois Schuman family, one of J.S. Effertz’s boys, and several of John Hauer’s children have the influenza. It is also in the Buetow, Matt Schmitt, and Albert Schmitt households. None of the cases are other than what are known as mild cases.

Pictured at right is an ad that appeared weekly in the Herald during the last few months of 1918. According to the National Museum of American History, Hill’s Bromide Cascara Quinine was recommended for the relief of the following discomforts usually associated with colds: nasal stuffiness and discharge, headache, muscular aches and pains, neuralgia and neuritic pains, constipation, and that hot, flushed feeling. This product contained the following active ingredients: acetophenetidin (2 grs. per tablet), cascara sagrada, quinine sulfate, aloin, aspirin, and ephedrine sulfate.

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